Printed Materials

These resources are for reference only. They are not meant to be substitutes for street medic training, herbalism training, or formal medicine licensing. Remember, DO NO HARM. Expand your knowledge and realize when you need to seek more information. Do not practice medicine without a license and know your limits of what you can provide to people without causing harm.

For Protesters

Stay Healthy So You Can Stay In The Streets
A simple handout created by the BALM Squad with basic things to know before going to a protest.

Staying Healthy for Civil Disobedience Actions
How to prepare for arrests and things to consider prior to engaging in civil disobedience. Created by the BALM Squad.

Shit! We’re Going to Get Arrested!
A list of things to do to prepare for being arrested at a protest or other action. This condensed version of the “Staying Healthy for Civil Disobedience Actions” sheet is a quick reference for use when it looks like you and your friends are about to be arrested. Created by the BALM Squad.

For Medics

How to Organize a 20HR Street Medic Training
This how-to guide was created by one of the founding members of ARM to help guide people who want to host a 20HR Street Medic Training, but may have no experience doing so.

A Street Medic’s Guide to Hypothermia
A review sheet created by the BALM Squad that covers signs of hypothermia, ways to prevent it, and ways to treat it.

Spanish Phrase Book for First Aid Trained Activists
Created by the BALM Squad, this is a very helpful pamphlet that provides commonly used Spanish phrases in a first-aid environment.

It’s Hot! It’s Sunny! 
Created by the BALM Squad, this pamphlet goes over common illnesses to look for on hot days, and how to keep folks around you safe and healthy.

Responding to Critical Incident Stress in Protests and Mass Mobilizations
An resource on psychological trauma/critical incident stress by an activist and clinical psychologist. Created by the BALM Squad.

Herbalism

Southwest School of Botanical Medicine
Here you will find lots of online information about plant identification, writings by Michael Moore, reference texts, classic texts on herbalism, and more. A great resource for online learning.

7Song’s Handouts
Instead of listing each hand out individually, we will simply direct you to this amazing page on 7Song’s website. Here you will find information on how to plan an herbal first aid tent for an encampment, resources for studying different parts of the body from an herbalism perspective, how to wildcraft, and many other topics.

Community Health Care

Where There Is No Doctor
The most widely-used health care manual for health workers, educators, and others involved in primary health care delivery and health promotion programs around the world.

Where Women Have No Doctor
An essential resource for any woman or health worker who wants to improve her health and the health of her community, and for anyone to learn about problems that affect women differently from men. Topics include reproductive health, concerns of girls and older women, violence, mental health, and more.

A Community Guide to Environmental Health
This guide contains information, activities, stories, and instructions for simple technologies that help health promoters, environmental activists, and community leaders take charge of their environmental health.

Pesticides Are Poison
This chapter from A Community Guide to Environmental Health, available as a 36-page booklet, offers information and activities to help reduce harm caused by pesticides, to treat people in pesticide emergencies, and to understand legal and political issues related to pesticide use.

Sanitation and Cleanliness
This chapter from A Community Guide to Environmental Health, available as a 48-page booklet, offers basic information on toilet building as well as learning activities to help communities understand and prevent sanitation-related health problems.

Water for Life
This chapter from A Community Guide to Environmental Health, available as a 48-page booklet, helps communities improve drinking water sources, treat water to make it safe for drinking, and organize water projects to protect access to clean water.

A Book for Midwives
A vital resource for practicing midwives and midwifery training programs around the world, this book covers the essentials of care before, during, and after birth. It has been updated to reflect new WHO/UNICEF guidelines and standards for mothers and newborns.

Where There Is No Dentist
This basic dental manual uses straightforward language and step-by-step instructions to discuss preventive care of teeth and gums, diagnosing and treating common dental problems, and includes a special chapter on oral health and HIV.

Helping Health Workers Learn
An indispensable resource for health educators, this book shows – with hundreds of methods, aids and learning strategies – how to make health education engaging and effective, and how to encourage community involvement through participatory education.

Disabled Village Children
This manual contains a wealth of clear and detailed information along with easy-to-implement strategies for all who are concerned about the well being of children with disabilities, especially those living in communities with limited resources.

A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities
Developed with the participation of women with disabilities in 42 countries, this guide helps women to overcome the barriers of social stigma and inadequate care to improve their general health, self-esteem, and independence as active members of their communities.

Helping Children Who Are Deaf
This groundbreaking book, packed with activities on how to foster language learning through both sign and oral approaches, supports parents and other caregivers in building the communication skills of babies and young children.

Helping Children Who Are Blind
The simple and engaging activities in this book can help parents, caregivers, teachers, health workers, rehabilitation workers, and others help a child with vision problems develop all of his or her capabilities.

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